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At the very beginning of July, a fanatic Greek priest reached the public sculpture “Crisis” to disfigure it with a hammer. The artwork is an original sculpture of Tasos Nyfadopoulos, a young Greek artist whose artworks can also be found on our platform Feral Horses, who donated his work to the city of Athens in 2015.
The attack to the statue was recorded in a video made by the attacker himself, which was later uploaded to Youtube. In the footage, the priest condemns the artwork for being evil, before starting hammering it: he also urges his followers in joining his cause. The priest was not new to these videos: on his channel there are other videos of him vandalizing ATM points, wind up people against the system as he says it is evil.
The sculpture “Crisis”, a monument considered of national heritage, had been conceived to make people reflect on the financial crisis, which had deeply affected the Greek population in the last years. It was Tasos’ s gift to the city of Athens and the first sculpture to deal with such a topic. Tasos Nyfadopoulos was very shocked by the attack and denounced it with the authorities. He also released a video on Youtube to better explain the attack and what the next steps will be. The video quickly went viral in Greece and elsewhere too, witnessing a rise in views. The artist will soon start a crowdfunding page to raise money and pay for repairs to the sculpture damages and for the legal expenses he is facing.
Such a gesture has rightly been condemned by the public opinion. Once again, this was an episode where art and artists were victims of close-minded ideologies. We at Feral Horses believe that attacks such as this should be denounced as much as possible: we believe that spreading the truth about the acts of few foolish people is the most impactful way to sensitise people to respect for art. We stand by Tasos, supporting him in bringing this episode to the eyes of as many people as possible, as he is one of our Feral Artists and we have the duty to protect his talent.