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Harakirina

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The engine of her work is fuelled by her own processes of life, which pierce her through singular and collective experiences that she captures in her pictures, as sround with different identities of transgressive femininity and those concepts around her sexuality that conform her trajectory. Through the public exposure of her intimacy, and of the pleasure of the creative ritual itself, she represents her own vision of the world as she explores a vital becoming that brings the private space into the public scene.

Harakirina (Iria Onieva, Vigo, 1982) currently living in Barcelona starts her self-portraits series in a self-taught way, aiming at a personal and creative empowerment that would channel her living circumstances. As an anonymous and invisible gang girl, her self-portraits actually show an heterogeneity of women that have certain things in common: arrogance, vendetta thirst and insurrection… those women who use all the devices available in the current consumerist society to turn them into their atrezzo and giving them new uses and meanings.

Her pictures lack conscious intentionality in the beginning, they get elaborated as she perfections her occupation, they burst in a moment of inspirational spark, from an impulse shot in her creative space, which is mostly her bedroom, as a hiding place where she is her own model: naughty at times, often nostalgic and always irreverent.  Following a set of original aesthetic and expressionist criteria, she recreates either gloomy environments inhabited by melancholy or colourful scenes filled with her attitude, which always share the intimacy of her bedroom and her body, -a body that represents that utopic ideal space, surrounded and submitted by a capitalist logic- that question, with a non necessarily transgressive look and an ironic eye.

‘We can do as we please. For them we are invisible’: if this quote is revealing and decisive for Foxfire gang girls, it is also for Harak who, radically subversive, does whatever she likes in her hiding own place. With a genuine style, sexualized and often with great dose of humour, Harakirina spontaneously shoots her camera creating her unique self-portraits.

 

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